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I really hope this column will bless you. You can read the most recent column below and previous columns at the archive.

Basics: Breathe Prayer

Posted by Kyle on June 20, 2015

I’m not sure about the context, and I don’t remember where I saw it, but the picture immediately resonated as true. An older woman was sitting at a table in a restaurant with a teenage boy, presumably her grandson. She was looking at him with a less-than-pleased look on her face. He was wearing noise-cancelling headphones and looking down at his phone. The caption read something like, “Put your phone down! She just wants to talk to you.”

I wonder what happened when the waiter came by. I wonder if the promise of food finally prompted the boy to put down his phone. He might have very quickly engaged with the people around him when he wanted something from them, but I wonder how quickly the headphones went back on when the waiter left.

Basics: Struggle with Scripture

Posted by Kyle on June 6, 2015

I hate being wrong more than almost anything else. Most people do. Maybe you don’t hate it as much as I do, but nobody enjoys eating crow and admitting that they were wrong.

However, in his book Margin, Dr. Richard Swenson prescribes that people with Type-A personalities (like me) admit to being wrong out loud in front of someone else at least twice a day. Talk about a tough pill to swallow.

Basics: Stand in the right place

Posted by Kyle on May 30, 2015

I like darts. It is a simple game and it’s a lot of fun to play. But, I am really just not that good.

I recently improved my game dramatically, however. I learned how to stand in the right place.

Doesn’t that sound basic? Standing in a straight line with the center of the target doesn’t seem revolutionary, but the results don’t lie. I’ve thrown some of the best games of my life recently because I got something very basic right.

The Christian life is much the same way.

Rethinking Jesus: Jesus wept

Posted by Kyle on May 23, 2015

Over the past couple months, several people rather close to me have passed away. When I stop to think about it, I hurt.

I know I’m not the only one. I’m not the only one close to these friends of mine. Not only that, but people die day, and the people close to them suffer for it. Husbands lose wives. Mothers lose sons. Children lose parents. Friends are parted. Death hurts and life hurts even more.

Even Jesus was not immune to the grief of loss.

Something about the recent Indiana religious freedom restoration act has really bothered me. It doesn’t bother me that business owners refuse to participate in practices they do not believe in like it bothers the liberal multitudes. And it doesn’t bother me that people from jurisdictions with similar laws criticize Indiana’s version, like it does the conservative legion.

You may wonder at my untimeliness. I’ve waited to see if the new legislation in Indiana bothers anyone the same way it bothers me. I would like to invite you to be bothered by Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act the same way I think it would bother Jesus.

Rethinking Jesus: Jesus wasn't married

Posted by Kyle on May 2, 2015

In 2003, Dan Brown took the literary world by storm with a murder mystery that based much of its intrigue on the controversial and extraordinary claim Jesus was married. Dan Brown was able to make this claim because he didn’t take the canonical 66 books of the Bible seriously. Neither do Mormons, who also like to claim that Jesus was married (to two women, no less).

Rethinking Jesus: Jesus makes the party better

Posted by Kyle on April 25, 2015

Since the beginning of civilization, marriage has been a cornerstone institution. Almost as long as marriage has been an institution, marriages have begun at ceremonies we call weddings. And as long as there have been weddings, weddings have gone terribly wrong.

Grooms say something stupid. Brides pass out from standing too long. Embarrassing secrets are revealed. Cakes end up places cakes shouldn’t be. Rings get lost. At the very best, the weather doesn’t cooperate.

Rethinking Jesus: Jesus was poor

Posted by Kyle on April 18, 2015

One of the burning questions people who study the life of Jesus tend to have is what Jesus was like before the beginning of his public ministry.

John and Mark’s gospels begin the story of Jesus with his baptism. Matthew and Luke give great details on his birth and Luke’s gospel shares a brief story from Jesus’ adolescence, but still there is very little information to go on.

Rethinking Jesus: Jesus was the God-Man

Posted by Kyle on April 11, 2015

In 325 A.D., the church was in trouble. Over the nearly three centuries since Jesus ascended to heaven, Christians had been struggling with exactly what Jesus was. They had a pretty good understanding of who he was, and what his significance was, but what he was proved a much more elusive idea.

A pastor friend of mine has a catchphrase I’d like to borrow. He says his job is to “make much of the name of Jesus.”

Lately, I’ve been considering who this man we worship and praise and serve really was. If we are to make much of his name, we should know what his name stands for.

Rethinking Jesus: Jesus never gave up

Posted by Kyle on March 28, 2015

I have found when I have a conflict with someone, the easiest thing to do is to just write him off. Just don’t talk to him anymore. Boot him right out of your life. Give up all hope the relationship can be repaired.

Being the easiest and most expedient way to handle relationships gone awry, it’s interesting to note Jesus never employed such a modern approach.

Jesus of Nazareth has proved to be one of history’s most influential figures. Plenty can be said about how he changed the course of human history, but very little seems to ever be said about how he began human history.

John 1:3 and Colossians 1:16 both affirm Jesus, God the Son, was the most active person of the Trinity in the creation of the universe and, consequently, of Adam, Eve, you and me.

Rethinking Jesus: Jesus was probably bullied

Posted by Kyle on March 7, 2015

There’s a funny little chapter in Isaiah. Sometimes I’ll read it to people when I do street evangelism without telling them where it is. It says things like, “But He was pierced through for our transgressions, he was crushed for our iniquities; the punishment that fell upon him was for our well-being.” (Isaiah 53:5)

Something terrible happens when we tell a story over and over again.

Familiarity with people breeds contempt and familiarity with stories breeds blindness. How many times to we tell the Christmas story use words like "stable" and "manger," and fail - because of our own desensitization to the story - to realize that when the King of the Universe came to earth, he was born in a barn and slept a feeding trough?

Rethinking Jesus: Jesus cared more about why than what

Posted by Kyle on February 21, 2015

My hand stung a bit, but otherwise I felt really good. I had just punched my main playground rival in the face. Boy, did he have it coming. The next thing to deal with? That annoying teacher who would tell me to apologize. I didn’t want to apologize. I didn’t feel sorry. But I knew if I apologized, even if I didn’t mean it, she wouldn’t call my parents, so I just said, “Sorry.”

The teacher bought it. I did exactly what I was supposed to.

I don’t think Jesus would’ve bought it, though.